Get involved

AgeWatch report card

Argentina

21.8

Life expectancy at 60

The number of years a 60-year-old can expect to live

17.3

Healthy life expectancy aged 60

The number of years a 60-year-old can expect to live in good health

89%

Pension coverage

% of people receiving a pension at retirement age

Is there a national health plan that includes ageing?

6.8 million people over 60

15.4

2017

17.4

2030

23.5

2050

% of population over 60

Quick link to further information

Older woman exercises in Argentina (c) Asociacion Israelita Argentina AMIA

Key findings

  • Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 88.2 per cent of the total years lived with disability in 2015.
  • The burden of disability from injuries increased for older women and men between 1990 and 2015.
  • The rates of dementia in women and men are similar until around the age of 70; beyond this, prevalence in both sexes increases rapidly but there is a steeper rise in the rates for women than for men.
  • Ten per cent of women between ages 50 and 54 reported experiencing violence during 2016, compared with about 5 per cent of men in the same age range.

Ageing and longevity in Argentina

Argentina's population is expected to surpass 49 million by 2030. The population aged 60 and above will continue to increase, while the youngest population (aged 0-14) will continue to decrease through to the end of the century (Figure A1).

Both men and women are living longer. While women are expected to outlive men by 6.8 years, the number of years spent in poor health - the gap between life expectancy and healthy life expectancy - is greater for women (9.6 years) than for men (7.6 years) (Figure A2).

Ageing and shifting patterns of disease and disability

As the population ages, the pattern of disease in Argentina is also shifting. NCDs accounted for 88.2 per cent of the total years lived with disability in Argentina in 2015. While NCDs contribute the vast majority of years lived with disability at all ages, the burden of disability from injuries also increased for older women and men between 1990 and 2015 (Figure A3). By contrast, burdens related to communicable, maternal, neonatal and nutritional diseases all decreased.
Even though the number of deaths related to NCDs has decreased in the last 25 years (1990-2015), in 2015, NCDs still accounted for about 86 per cent of all deaths among men and women in the age groups of between 50 and 69 and 70 and over in Argentina (Figure A4).

Ageing, mental health and cognitive impairment

The prevalence of major depressive disorders is decreasing among women in Argentina between ages 50 and 80, after which it increases (Figure A5). On average, women have higher rates of depressive disorders than men at every age.
Looking at the burden of deaths resulting from injuries, specifically self-harm, there are higher rates in men than women over the period 1990-2016. By contrast, there are declining rates in women and men between ages 50 and 69, and age 70 and over from 1995 onwards (Figure A6).
The rates of dementia (for example, Alzheimer's disease) in men and women are similar until around age 70, after which prevalence in both sexes increases rapidly, but with a steeper rise for women than for men (Figure A7).

Prevalence of violence towards older people

The prevalence of physical, sexual and psychological violence in Argentina was higher among older women than men, particularly among women aged between 50 and 70 (data for 1990-2016). About 10 per cent of women between ages 50 and 54 reported experiencing violence during 2016, compared with 5 per cent of men in the same age group (Figure A8).

Poverty and health financing

In 2015, Argentina spent 6.8 per cent of its gross domestic product on healthcare. This is close to the Latin American and the Caribbean regional average of 7.4 per cent.
While older adults access Argentina's Programa de Atención Médica Integral, there are gaps in universal health coverage (UHC) and most Argentinians also have social health or private insurance.
Estimated out-of-pocket health expenditure - that is, the amount paid for by a household - in Argentina decreased from 31.4 per cent of current health expenditure in 2008 to 17.6 per cent in 2015. In 2015, 55.4 per cent of the population reported being satisfied with public hospitals compared with 52.7 per cent in 2010.
It is not possible to analyse expenditure or access to health insurance, mandatory or voluntary, by age group due to lack of age disaggregation in the relevant international datasets.
Download the Global AgeWatch Insights Argentina country profile.

Rank by domain

Indicators data What does this mean?
Pension coverage: 90.7 % people over 65 receiving a pension.
Old age poverty rate: 10.4 % of people aged 60+ with an income of less than half the country's median income.
Relative welfare: 108.7 Average income/consumption of people aged 60+ as a % of average income/consumption of the rest of the population.
GNI per capita: US$ 15,347.0 This is a proxy for standard of living of people within a country. It aims to provide comparison across countries.
Indicators data What does this mean?
Life expectancy at 60: 21 The average number of years a person aged 60 can expect to live.
Healthy life expectancy at 60:16.6 The average number of years a person aged 60 can expect to live in good health.
Relative psychological/mental wellbeing:96.8 % of people over 50 who feel their life has meaning compared with people aged 35-49 who feel the same.
The indicator measures self-assessed mental well-being.
Indicators data What does this mean?
Employment of older people: 59.2 % of the population aged 55-64 that are employed.
The indicator measures older people's access to the labour market and their ability to supplement pension income with wages, and their access to work related networks. The employment rate is a proxy for the economic empowerment of older people.
Educational attainment:39.7 % of population aged 60+ with secondary or higher education.
Education is a proxy of lifetime accumulation of skills and competencies that shows social and human capital potential inherent among older people.
Indicators data What does this mean?
Social connections: 87 % of people over 50 who have relatives or friends they can count on when in trouble.
Physical safety: 41 % of people over 50 who feel safe walking alone at night in the city or area where they live.
Civic freedom: 78 % of people over 50 who are satisfied with the freedom of choice in their life.
Access to public transport: 52 % of people over 50 who are satisfied with the local public transportation systems.

Social pension

Social pensions are non-contributory cash transfers to older people, provided by government. For more information see www.pension-watch.net.

Country ageing data

The global agewatch blog

Global Agewatch

Blog

Infographics